Financial Anxiety

Financial Anxiety and How to Battle It

Financial Anxiety

Current internet articles, posts, and headlines are filled with descriptions of the financial issues troubling many Americans. Layoffs, tax debt, and bankruptcies can add to the financial stress, and according to the American Psychological Association (APA), it’s taking a huge toll on our health.

While the country continues to recover from the recession, many of us still feel the weight of crushing debt. Unfortunately, prolonged financial stress can negatively affect our physical, mental, and emotional health. The good news is that help is available. Options like relief from tax burdens, debt management programs, and budgeting strategies can provide hope for anyone feeling the pressure of financial stress.

Managing that stress and finding support are essential to a journey towards financial wellness. Here are some tips for battling financial anxiety:

Know Yourself

No matter what you are going through, there is one person that you can always count on — yourself. Money problems aren’t necessarily your fault. However, your attitude will be one of the greatest determining factors for success. When you are surrounded by debt, with no end in sight, you can do two things: you can worry and stress about your problems, or you can embrace the experience as an opportunity for growth and learning.

Think about your financial problems as financial bloggers think about their money problems. They look at their finances as a resource for learning; once they learn what they need to thrive, they turn around and teach others. This learn-then-teach attitude is a healthy way to approach debt and desperation. Your debt is both an obstacle to overcome and an opportunity to become financially savvy.

Look for Support

Dealing with financial issues is stressful. However, perhaps the most difficult part is accepting help (either financial or emotional) from those around you. The APA lists social support as one of the most useful tools in the journey to battle financial anxiety. The APA recommends the following strategies to grow your support network:

  • Cast a wide net. Nurture relationships with all types of people, e.g., co-workers, friends, family, religious leaders.
  • Be proactive. Be confident enough to approach others about your struggles.
  • Take advantage of technology. Use apps, blogs, and other resources available to reach others. Find the best budgeting apps to increase your savings and create a plan to escape your debt.
  • Follow your interests. Use your hobbies to connect with others.
  • Seek out peer support. Blogs are a great way to connect with people in the same situation.

Help Others

Teaching others what you learn can be an important step on your path to financial peace. Consider sharing tips, strategies, and experiences through a blog. You will discover two things when you seek to help others learn how to establish financial goals: support can be found by supporting others, and the fastest way to learn is to teach. And who knows? You may even find another career path offering online financial advice.

Aggressively Seek Financial Freedom

The options for escaping debt are as numerous as the avenues for falling into debt. You should be seeking any and all viable options for relieving your financial burdens. Debt management and debt consolidation are feasible options for those with considerable debt. Budgeting, investing, job-seeking, raise- or bonus-seeking, and side hustles are all good ways to save.

Your journey to financial wellness will likely start out slowly. Yet, if you use the right money-saving methods, then before you know it, you’ll be racing down the road to a brighter financial future.

Get Budget Help With Budget Apps

What Are The Best Budgeting Apps of 2018?

The Best Budgeting Apps of 2018

Most people believe in the power of budgeting; some people think it’s just an excuse to avoid the real solution. Richard Quinn, a retired VP of Compensation and Benefits with over 50 years of experience in managing pension and 401k plans for a fortune 200 company, offers some profound advice about budgeting. One particular thing he mentioned about budgeting apps will strike a chord with most budgeting experts. According to Quinn, “Nobody needs an app. They don’t even need a budget. They need to do a few simple things: Take their net pay and save 10% or more, throw away all credit cards, buy what you can afford only and spend all you want after fixed expenses. No budget needed.” What Quinn suggests may shock some at first, but it makes sense. Essentially what he is asking is for you to be smart with your money. Stop spending it first and start saving it first.

Yet, there remains a virtue in budgeting apps that might be overlooked in Quinn’s suggestion. What a budgeting app does is it disciplines and trains you to be the type of spender that Quinn envisions. If you have already achieved a high level of self control, you don’t need an app; in that case, as Quinn says, you don’t even need a budget. For the rest of us—those who are still learning to spend wisely and save regularly—we need a bit of help. Here are the best budgeting apps for those who need extra help in 2018.

YNAB (You Need a Budget)

Budgeting apps come in all shapes in sizes. The best one will mostly depend on your personal taste, but for Larry Ludwig, Founder of Investor Junkie, “YNAB is the clear winner.” Ludwig explains that YNAB is his favorite for its simplicity and lack of confusing “bells and whistles” and notes that “for a first time budgeter, it’s important not to intimidate them with a complicated user experience.” The app’s website explains its method in three simple steps: “Get some dollars, prioritize those dollars, and follow the plan.” Those who are in debt are often swamped by numbers and projections of how much they need to spend or save. YNAB is a simple solution to get you back on track or stay on track.

Honeyfi

One of the coolest new budgeting apps is called Honeyfi, made for not only helping one person manage finances, but helps two at the same time. Most married couples have a hard time negotiating spending limits, individual allowances, and other finance rules. In the words of Sam Schultz, Co-Founder of Honeyfi, the free app seeks to solve that problem by helping “couples save more money, pay down more debt, and make better decisions.” Featured in HuffPost, MSN, and Entrepreneur, Schultz explains that the app does “spark a lot of communication IRL” and that it also allows “users to decide how much to share with their partner for each account (balances and/or transactions).” If you’re a couple looking to manage not one, but two different budgets, Honeyfi is a great option.

Mint

According to Brian Bartold, a licensed insurance professional with VFG Associates in Livonia, MI, the best overall budgeting app is Mint. This app lets you link “everything to the app including your credit cards, bank accounts and any brokerage or IRA accounts you have.” Though it might not have the speciality in helping couples like Honeyfi, Mint allows for more in-depth budgeting. Bartold also explains that Mint “also works with TurboTax and QuickBooks, two very popular programs for managing your taxes and bills.”

Even though Mint isn’t quite as cut and dry as other apps, it does simplify more complicated budgeting issues, like losing a job or going through a divorce, in a very helpful way. This simplification is possible because the app puts all financial processes in one place. Bartold explains this, saying “you may work with an insurance agent, stock broker, someone in your 401(k) department, all while doing stuff you are doing on your own. All those things are not being managed in one specific area. Using an app that combines everything you’re doing can make planning and budgeting simpler.” Mint is a great option for those with more money to budget and more financial issues to maneuver.

PocketGuard

The best part of the PocketGuard app is that it lets users link directly to their bank accounts so that all transactions and balances are current. As opposed to many other budgeting apps, PocketGuard is more focused on spending projections than it is past history. Because of this, the app can let you know how much pocket change you have to spend on any given day or even month. The app is a great alternative to Mint or YNAB if those apps aren’t to your liking.

As Richard Quinn pointed out, the best budgeting system available is your own persistence and determination. The purpose of a budgeting app should be to make your savings methods become habitual. Whether it’s Mint, PocketGuard, Honeyfi, YNAB, or some other budgeting app, make sure you are learning self-sufficiency and responsible spending. The most efficient budgeting tool should be your habits.

How Katherine in Michigan Retired Debt Free

Name: Katherine

Age: 62

Location: Michigan

When did you enroll in our debt settlement program and how much debt were you facing?

I had about 23,0000.00 worth of debt with 2 credit cards.

Why did you choose Pacific Debt over the options and companies you researched?

When I was looking for a company, basically, I went thru and saw Pacific Debt, I called and was put in touch with Josh Hallas.  In just speaking to him and his reassurances, I knew this was the company I was supposed to deal with.  Josh explained the company and just what we would have to do and he sent me the paperwork, and that was that.

Tell us about your journey through the Pacific Debt program? Are there any special team members you would like to recognize?

I have had Josh Hallas primarily throughout my whole journey.  There was another gentleman that I was dealing with, but then I was transferred back to Josh.  The last person I dealt with was Bethany R.  She was very helpful, but I was always transferred back to Josh.

How does it feel to be debt free? What are your financial goals moving forward?

It feels like a weight has been lifted off my shoulders and now I can retire knowing that I don’t have any financial debt hanging over my head.  That was and still is my primary goal.  Without the help of Josh and the other folks that had my case, this probably wouldn’t have been possible  – for me to retire without any debt.  I want to thank all the people at PDI who were there for me when i needed that little push to get myself out of a sticky situation.  I would recommend PDI to anyone who was in the situation.

We know we are not perfect. What suggestions or advice would you offer to help us improve our program? All advice is welcome.

I can’t think of anything that you would need to change, all of your people are very kind, courteous and helpful.  I thank them all from the bottom of my heart!!

Meet Christopher – Now Debt Free Thanks to Pacific Debt

Name: Christopher

Age: 35

Location: California

When did you enroll in our debt settlement program and how much debt were you facing? How did carrying all of that debt make you feel?

We enrolled March 2016 in Pacific Debt’s program, with $23,176 in debt. Carrying that much debt made it almost impossible to make ends meet. We could make only minimum payments, and would immediately be checking balances and available credit to see which card we could use next. Purchases were for necessities, not fun or frivolous items. We lived credit card limit to credit card limit.

Christoper, Debt Free, Pacific Debt

Tell us about your journey through the Pacific Debt program? Are there any special team members you would like to recognize?

Our journey through Pacific Debt’s program was worry free and easy. We were contacted immediately whenever something was needed, and we were informed of every step taken along the way. Brian LoBianco was amazing to work with! He took care of our account and our debts in the fastest way possible, never neglecting quality service, and ended up getting us great settlement agreements with our creditors. He was professional at all times, and we could tell that he cared about us and the assistance he provided.

How does it feel to be debt free? What are your financial goals moving forward?

It feels amazing to be debt free! One thing this program allowed us to do is learn how to live without using credit. By not being able to use our cards, and by lightening the load that we carried, we were able to manage our budget in a credit free way, realizing what we really needed, and what we could do without. Our financial goals are to continue to live completely free of revolving debt, not having to worry about paying high interest for what easily could have been the rest of our lives doing what we were doing before.

We know we are not perfect. What suggestions or advice would you offer to help us improve our program? All advice is welcome.

I honestly was completely satisfied. I will say, the first 6 months to 1 year of creditor/collector phone calls was nerve racking. Understanding that things had to get worse before they could get better was key, though it was still a time that worried us. Pacific Debt made sure we understood the process, and what to do with those calls and contacts, and that made all the difference. We knew Pacific Debt was in our corner the whole time.

Pacific Debt Inc. Debt Validation

Read Over 1300 Real Pacific Debt Client Reviews

At Pacific Debt, we’ve always focused on providing an awesome customer experience and delivering great results. Over the past 15 years, our team has settled over $200 million in consumer credit card debt and helped tens of thousands of individuals and families. Read more Pacific Debt reviews from people we have helped get debt relief through our debt settlement program.

A couple of years, ago, our team started actively asking our customers to share their experiences online, so that others who are struggling with debt could see for themselves the power of our program. In that time, our customers have shared over 1300 online reviews, with an average weighted user score of 9.47 out of 10.

Consumers who are struggling with excessive credit card debt are often unsure where to turn for help. Being an Accredited Debt Relief provider is no longer good enough for consumers who are living in the age of Yelp and Amazon, where real customer feedback and reviews are easy to come by. We’ve found that these first-hand experiences, from real customers, really make a big difference for consumers who are weighing their options and evaluating different companies.

While the majority of reviews are overwhelmingly positive and validate our program, we don’t turn a blind eye to opportunities for improvement. Any negative feedback received is used as a customer service opportunity and we follow up with our clients to better understand their situation and see what can be done to turn things around for them.

Read Recent Pacific Debt Reviews

To highlight the power of our online customer reviews, here is a recent review from Marissa in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania via BestCompany.com:

“After doing some research and reading online reviews, I decided to reach out to Pacific Debt for help with my credit card and loan debt. I worked first with Rian to go over who they are as a company and how they were going to help. After being setup and starting their program, Kimberly B. became my account manager and main point of contact throughout this program. She’s awesome and keeps me in the loop regarding my account and settlement progress. It is easy to get in contact with anyone at Pacific Debt with questions or concerns. They understand your situation and answered any and all questions that I had.”

Read More of Our Reviews from our debt relief clients

For consumers interested in reading our online reviews, a compilation of our real client reviews can be found below:

What you're doing wrong with your debt

What You’re Doing Wrong With Your Debt

It’s likely that you only use credit cards to make everyday purchases. People don’t often carry around cash anymore simply because credit cards are more convenient. You might even have several cards for specific stores. You make payments here and there and wonder why all the sudden, you’re thousands of dollars in debt. $40 on gas + $100 on groceries + $5 on coffee + $15 on lunch during the week will definitely add up. I can also bet that you’re not just at the coffee shop or sandwich stand next door once a week. Then take that credit card debt and add it to your car payments, student loans and mortgage and you’re likely drowning in all the numbers next to that dollar sign. There are several ways to pay off your debt, but some methods are more effective than others. If several years have gone by and you’re still making payments on credit cards and loans, you’re probably doing something wrong.

Here are some of the common mistakes people make when paying off debt and how you can get out of that trap as soon as possible:

You don’t have a plan

It’s great that you are putting payments on your credit cards, but without a smart plan, you won’t really see your efforts pay off as much as they can. If you have several credit cards, it’s smart to make a list before you tackle them. Write down the credit card name, balance due, interest rate, minimum payment and due date. Some people have made the mistake of putting the minimum payment on all their cards or focusing on the credit card with the most balance. While this is a plan, it’s not the best one. Instead, focus on the card with the highest interest rate as that the one worth paying off first and the pay the minimum on the rest of your cards until you can solely focus on them. You’ll pay off your debt quicker in the long run when you’re paying off bigger amounts on a single card. Mainly focusing on one balance also makes your debt seem less overwhelming as opposed to throwing $50 here and there on multiple cards at the same time.

You’re missing payments

While you’re devising your plan, set up all your accounts to automatically pay by the due date. This will ensure that you’re not hit with late payments. If you know exactly how much will be coming out of your bank account and when, it’ll be easier to make sure you have the right amount of funds for that payment every time. You can even change the payment dates to work around your paychecks. Noting all of your debt information on paper or on a spreadsheet will help you see things in a bigger picture so you’re prepared every month. If you are charged with a late fee, call the credit card company and kindly ask if they will waive it for you. They’ll be more likely to reverse the fee if you tell them you’ll be setting your account to automatic payment, if this is your first late fee or if you’ve been a long time valued customer. It never hurts to ask.

You keep a balance on your cards to build credit

Keeping up your credit score should definitely not be a priority over paying off your debt and it’s likely that your good credit score got you into this debt in the first place. Carrying a balance on your card each month that you’re being charged interest for is actually ruining your credit. Pay off your debt now and stop worrying about hurting your credit score. There are several ways to boost your credit when it’s time, but for now, paying off these cards should be number one on your list. Also keep in mind that just because you have a high limit on your credit card doesn’t mean you should be maxing it out. A $15,000 credit limit does not equate to a shopping spree. In fact, you should be keeping your utilization rate low and your balance should not exceed 30% of your credit limit. For example, a card with a limit of $15,000 should never have more than a $4,500 balance. Doing this will definitely protect your score later.

You’re putting it off until you make more money

“When I make more money, I’ll pay this card off. When I make more money, I’ll clear all my debt. When I make more more money, life will be great.” Well when will that be? The time is now. The longer you procrastinate paying off your debt, the more debt you’ll be in. Simple as that. An emergency might come up. Your company might downsize. You might decide to pursue a different career and end up working a lower paying job until you learn the ropes. Who knows what can happen, but you don’t want to have all this debt acquiring on top of it all. Start paying off as much as you can starting now.

You don’t know your options

Stuck paying a high balance on loans you simply cannot afford right now? Got a balance with high interest rates? You have options and asking what they are is where you can start. If you’re paying off student loans and don’t make enough money to pay the monthly payments, don’t have a job as a recent graduate or recently got laid off, you can request a deferment or forbearance for a certain amount of time. Stopping payments on student loans for now can help you focus on your other debt. Refinance your car to reduce the amount you pay each month, reduce your interest rate and change the length of your loan. Also ask your credit card company if you can reduce the interest charge on your monthly payment. Some companies will grant this request if you’ve been a loyal customer who makes payments on time. It also helps if you have a good credit score or if it has recently improved. These companies want to keep you as a customer so simply request a lower interest rate and hope for the best.

You always give into your friends’ invitations

We’re not telling you to live like a hermit crab until you’ve zeroed out all your cards and loans, but you need to be smart about where you go out and how often. As much as you want to and as hard as it is to break bad habits, don’t accept every invitation your friends throw your way. Lunch here, coffee there, brunch on weekends and happy hour during the game can cost you hundreds of dollars a month when you add it all up. Plan accordingly, choose the events and be ready to decline if it’s something you can’t afford to do. Only try going out to celebrate your friends’ special occasions like birthdays and anniversaries and avoid the random “Wanna grab a drink?” invites. If your colleagues always go out for lunch on Fridays and you don’t want to miss out, vow to eat a packed lunch for the rest of the week and choose an affordable option on the menu. If you’re invited to watch the game at a bar during happy hour, eat at home first and you won’t be tempted to order something at the restaurant. You also don’t need to order a drink to enjoy the game. Be smart and disciplined (almost like you’re on a diet). When you’re on a diet, you watch what you eat, you create a meal plan, resist temptation and create incentives when you achieve your goals, like if you lose 10 lbs. in 2 months, you’ll buy new workout shoes. When you’re on a spending diet, you need to decide what’s a necessity and what’s a splurge. Create incentives the same way and treat yourself without breaking the bank. For example, for every $1,000 you pay off, reward yourself with a Netflix binge, a drive to the beach, a homemade pancake breakfast or a lazy day to sleep in and do absolutely nothing. Having a reward system for your goal to pay off debt can help you achieve it faster.

It’s not a priority

Having large amounts of debt can be extremely detrimental to many factors in your life. It can affect you buying a house, buying a car, going on vacations, changing your career, opening up a business or going to grad school. It can even cost you landing your dream job as a larger percent of employers check your credit along with running a background check. According to a 2012 study from the Society for Human Resource Management, 47% of U.S. companies conduct credit checks and if they see that you have poor credit history, have missed payments, filed bankruptcy or have large amounts of debt, it could cost you the job.

Your life will benefit greatly when you learn how to manage your money, pay off cards in full and on time, and experience what it’s like to live debt-free. It’ll feel like a huge weight has been lifted off your shoulders and you could be a lot closer to it than you think. Just make paying off debt a priority, cut out the bad habits that are costing you money, make a plan, find out your options and be disciplined. This can be hard, but it can be done. You just have to start somewhere. Don’t let debt run your life and the sooner you start paying if off, the sooner you can start living your life to the fullest.

Top 5 causes of debt

Top 5 Causes of Debt & How To Fix Them

They say it’s smart to have between 3-6 months worth of expenses saved up in case of an emergency. To give you an idea, if your monthly expenses round up to $5,000, there should be $30,000 sitting your saving account right now. But in this age of consumerism, people are likely swimming in debt instead of in a comfortable amount of hundred dollar bills. As of May 2016, 38.1% of all households carry some sort of credit card debt and according to the most recent survey from the U.S. Federal Reserve, the average credit card debt of U.S. households is about $5,700. That’s a lot of money to be sitting on credit cards that likely comes with an interest rate that will boost that debt even higher.

Sometimes, debt is accumulated from massive charges that are typically unexpected such as a medical emergency, a broken car or a divorce, but usually, accrued debt is over a longer period of time by charging common expenses like gas and groceries. These “small” charges here and there look unthreatening at first, but then it spirals out of control where you end up only paying the minimum balance each month, leaving you with more interest to pay in the future.

Here are the top 5 causes of debt and some suggestions for how you can get address the problem.

1. Divorce

The leading cause of arguments among couples revolves around money more than any other causes of typical domestic disputes. It’s likely that one or both parties had accrued debt prior to getting married and “what’s yours is mine” unfortunately applies to the bills too. Although it’s recommended to discuss money and spending habits before tying the knot, if couples don’t create a reasonable plan to paying off debt and spending money, it will lead to marital strife that can turn into divorce. The average percent of divorce in the United States is between 40-50% and the cost of getting divorced is $15,000-$20,000. Also going from a two-income household back to one can take a significant toll on your bank account.

2. Unemployment & Underemployment

No one expects to lose their job and it never comes at a good time. Unless you have the recommended 6 months worth of expenses stored in your savings account, you’re going to have a lot of accrued debt sooner than later just to pay off your current bills and it’s possible that it’ll take longer than 6 months to get another job. There’s also the unfortunate occurrence of taking a pay cut when having to suddenly work part-time either due to having a child, a medical issue, or getting fewer shifts at work. We’re creatures of habit, so although our employment status might have changed, it’s very likely that our spending habits haven’t. People are typically spending more than they earn and recent studies have shown that although income is decreasing, the rate of spending is still climbing up, which leads to the next reason for debt.

3. Poor Money Management

Related to financial illiteracy, not many people have a good grasp of managing the money they earn likely because they were never taught the simple rules of spending and saving growing up. These people rely on credit cards for expenses and the idea of instant gratification is a major factor. It’s so appealing for us to buy something and have it now, but pay for it later. If you don’t pay off your credit card balance in full, you’ll end up paying a good chunk of it in interests. Most credit cards today have an interest rate ranging between 15-20%, making anything you buy cost a whole lot more than what you paid for. This also ties in with impulse spending and making poor financial decisions. Having a monthly game plan to tackle your common expenses will keep you from spending more than you make. It’ll also be a good idea to educate yourself on the rules of the bank, loans and credit cards to see if you can reduce your fees, avoid late charges and have 0% APR for a set period of time.

4. Minimum Payment Trap

So you racked up a credit card and can’t pay the full balance. You know you have to pay something on it so you set up your account to automatically pay the minimum every month and brush it off, feeling assured that payments are being made. Months later, you check your account and wonder why you still owe so much. Well, that’s interest for you! Here’s an example to give you an idea: If you owe $10,000 on a credit card and pay a minimum of $250 per month and your interest is 15%, you’re going to be paying $3,950 in interest in the 56 months it’ll take you to pay it off. That $10,000 easily turns into nearly $14,000 before you know it. If your interest rate is 20%, that payment towards interest becomes $6,617 and it’ll take you 67 months to pay it all off! That’s over 5 years of your life spent paying off this credit card while you’re stuck paying off your typical expenses too, such as food, gas, rent or mortgage and a car. Bottom line is that you should always pay the balance in full, but if you can’t, pay as much as you can as fast as you can.

5. Military Status

A recent study revealed that members of the military accrue debt at a higher rate than civilians and there are a number of reasons why. First of all, military members may be receiving a steady paycheck but it isn’t large enough to support their means, especially if they’re supporting a family, making them resort to credit cards to compensate. Next, frequently moving can add to the debt if an active military personnel is forced to sell their home and they can’t get an immediate buyer. They end up paying two mortgages until they receive an offer on their old home. It may also be difficult for the spouse to find a good-paying job right away during relocation. And finally, when military members find themselves in debt, they end up staying in debt because they don’t want their superiors finding out. They don’t seek out help due to their fear of losing their security clearance, ruining their chances of a career advancement or being discharged. This just makes their debt continually increase.

If you’re currently in one of these situations, there are a number of routes to take to reduce your debt, but the first step should be to come up with a spending plan and stick to it. Review your spending habits and see where you can cut down. Your daily cup of Joe at the local coffee shop can definitely add up in the bills. Pay your balances in full as often as you can and use cash if you’ve got it. People tend to spend less when they only use real money to pay. And most importantly, if you’re married, make sure you keep all lines of communication open and ask for help if you need it. In a perfect world, both parties of the couple will be savers but that’s an unlikely story. If you’re the spender, it might be a good idea to have your spouse manage the money until you’ve got a good grasp on saving more money each month.

If you feel like you’ve tried it all on your own and need professional help, one of our professional and friendly counselors here at Pacific Debt can talk you through your options. Our consultations are free and it’s our goal to get you out of debt for less than you currently owe.

Options for debt in a marriage

Debt in a Marriage: What Are My Options?

Marriage is supposed to be a beautiful thing, but sadly, so many newlyweds don’t know each other’s finances before tying the knot. If one spouse is entering the new courtship with a newfound debt from their partner, there are probably a lot of questions that need to be answered.

To help you understand debt that comes from a partner after marriage, here’s what you need to know:

Is it Mine, Yours or Ours?

Every state has their rules when it comes to who owns what debt. One of the first questions that newlyweds have when it comes to debt is: Who the heck is responsible for this debt?

The first thing that you need to look into is if your state is a community property state. In a community property state, such as Arizona, Idaho and more, the spouse may be liable for the debt upon marriage. However, in anon-community state, the spouse won’t be liable for any debt they didn’t sign up for. A quick search for your state laws can let you know where your state falls.

Combining Debts

Regardless of what your local state laws are, many couples often want to combine their debt to pay it down fast. If this is the route that you want to take, there are many options that you can take advantage of.

For instance, many credit card companies offer balance transfers for zero percent interest for a limited time period. This is a great way to combine your debts all under one account. If you’re going to take this route, just make sure that your balances aren’t too high, because if you don’t pay your bills off in time, you may be stuck with an interest rate that is higher than 20 percent.

If you don’t want to take the credit card route, consider talking with a reputable debt resolution company. A good debt resolution company will be accredited with the American Fair Credit Council (AFCC), have at least an A BBB rating and never charge you upfront fees. Generally, they will be able to save you around 50% on your original account balances, if not more. To learn more about how Pacific Debt can help, check out the details on our debt settlement program.

Lastly, if most of the debt is coming from student loans, look into various federal programs to help consolidate the loan. This is a route that should be taken if the student loans are in the tens of thousands.

Separating Finances

If you believe your spouse should pay for the debt they created, that’s fine. However, keep in mind that a successful relationship works on teamwork.

When going this route, it’s best to wait on a joint bank account or combining any other accounts until the debt is entirely paid off. Aside from the debt, also make sure that you put in your fair share to the bills that have to be paid every month, such as the utilities, rent, cable and so forth. Try to find that happy medium that works for your relationship

In the long run, debt is going to take time to pay off. As long as you work as a team, create a budget and motivate yourself to pay off these debts, there’s no reason the debt will ruin the newfound marriage.

Online Money Management for Consumers

Overwhelming credit card debt is often simply a symptom of poor spending and money management habits.

A great free resource for consumers who struggle to balance their check books each month is MINT.com. The site is owned and operated by Intuit, the same company that provides the popular Tubortax and Quickbooks software. The site is 100% FREE.

Mint.com ties together all of you finances into one easy to use portal, including your checking and savings accounts, retirement funds, credit cards, mortgages and car loans. In addition, it allows users to set up custom budgets and tracks all of your purchases, regardless of whether you use your credit card, debit or cash. With the click of your mouse you can quickly see how much you have spent at Starbucks, at Target or on more general categories such as groceries or clothing. Mint.com will tell you how your spending compares to others nationally and give you tips to save money.

If you would like a more personal approach to money management, call Pacific Debt today 1-877-722-3328 and one of our representatives would be happy to review and budget and explain your options for tackling your debt issues.

How the debt ceiling impacts your credit card debt

As most Americans are aware our elected officials are currently evaluating a number of plans aimed at getting our nation’s ballooning debt under control while concurrently raising the debt ceiling.

Without raising the debt ceiling, it is predicted that the US could default on its current debt obligations and see its credit rating plummet from AAA to D status. From a consumer’s standpoint that is like seeing your FICO credit score drop from 750 to 500 overnight. In fact, the Federal Reserve is making plans for this possible scenario.

If the US does default, consumers should expect to see higher interest rates on everything from Credit Cards, mortgage notes, and car loans.

If you already find yourself in a situation where you can not meet your credit card obligations or are struggling to do so, give our counselors a call today at 1-877-722-3328 or email us at [email protected]

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